If the Titanic had safely landed on April 16, 1912

April 16, 2012 is the one year anniversary of the blog Vampire Maman. It also would have been the 101st anniversary of the docking of the Titanic in New York City, if the Titanic had docked.

I have in my possession a curious bit of history. This one is real. Not fiction. It gave me the chills to read this and copy it for this post.

In a scrap book is a press release that would have gone out if the Titanic had landed safely in New York.

Rather than throwing it out an executive employee of the White Star line put it in his scrap book. And that is where it still is. And here it is…copied exactly word for word from the White Star Line.

______________________

To be released for Publication after arrival of ship, April 16th.

The latest Ocean Marvel White Star’s “Titanic”

Largest Vessel in the World Arrives in New York.

THE ACEM OF LUXURY AND COMFORT – SOME STRIKING INNOVATIONS.

The largest steamer in the world arrived in New York today (April 16) from Southampton and Cherbourg and Plymouth. Larger even than the giantess “OLYMPIC” the new White Star Line leviathan “TITANIC” began her maiden trip under the most auspicious circumstances.

Many wonderful innovations have been made part of this newest of transatlantic wonders. The “TITANIC’S” 66,000 tons of displacement and 46,328 tons gross register are not her sole claim to distinction as the most elaborate handiwork of shipwrights. The “TITANIC” is the first steamer to be built with private promenades in connection with some of her splendid suites. Heretofore the floating apartment hotels, but fall to the “TITANIC” to provide the transatlantic traveler with an actual private residence, even to the exclusive promenade deck without encroachment upon the hundreds of first-cabin voyagers.

The “TITANIC”, like its sister ship, the “OLYMPIC”, possesses the great length of 882 feet, 6 inches, and a beam of 92 feet, 6 inches. Over the boat deck, the “TITANIC’S” beam spans 94 feet even, from rail to rail.

Four great funnels rise 81 ½ feet above the uppermost deck with a total distance of 175 feet from the top of the funnels to the keel.

Fifteen watertight bulkheads divide the great vessel, making her unsinkable even though half of her compartments should be filled with water.  Eleven steel decks add to the “TITANIC’S” staunchness while an ideal of the vast promenading space may best be had when it is noted that the main promenade deck alone has an unbroken sweep of 190 yards on either side of the ship.

A Parisian Café and Palm Room are but some of the features of this remarkable vessel which will now enter regularly in the Plymouth-Cherbourg-Southampton-New York service with the “OLYMPIC.”

Besides the main dining salon, which has seating capacity for nearly 600 passengers, there is an a la carte restaurant, French service, which seats 200 passengers. The restaurant features will be especially appreciated by those who do not have the desire to be held to regular hours for dining, for night suppers, dinner parties, etc.

The size of the staterooms is also one of the remarkable features of the new giantess “TITANIC.” Varying from 8 feet to 9 feet, 6 inches in height, they are all roomy. Some of the 2-berth cabins are 17 x 10 feet, 6 inches in size. There are no 4-berth rooms, and a great number of single-berth rooms, 8 ½ by 10 ½ feet, have been provided.

A great swimming pool, squash racket course, gymnasium and the Turkish baths are all closely together on the lower deck, from which elevators carry the passengers to the various upper decks.

As in her sister ship, the “OLYMPIC,” passengers on the “TITANIC” will descent the grand staircase to the main reception room, which, in turn, leads into the great dining salon, from which it is separated by glass. Stretching the full width of the vessel amidships, the main dining salon is light and cheerful, and at night, with its myriads of electric lights, it presents a veritable fairyland.

Describing the gathering of the voyages in the reception room, awaiting the dinner hour, a writer has aptly remarked:

“Upon a dark, richly colored carpet, which will further emphasize the delicacy and refinement of the paneling and act as a foil to the light dresses of the ladies, this company will assemble – the apotheosis surely, of ocean-going luxury and comfort. What more appropriate setting than this dignified Jacobean room, redolent of the time when the Pilgrim Fathers set forth from Plymouth on their rude bark to brave the perils of the deep!”

There screws, propelled by turbine and reciprocating engines, furnished the motive power of the great “TITANIC.” Leaving Southampton and calling at Cherbourg and Plymouth for continental passengers on Wednesdays, she is expected to reach New York on the following Tuesday evening. The two ships will maintain an ocean ferry with regularity of other ferries across a river, for their immense tonnage displacement makes them practically impervious to the elements, no matter how adverse these may be.

The “TITANIC” and the “OLYMPIC,” as instruments of commerce, represent the highest skill and perfection yet reached in naval architecture; and in the struggle for supremacy they will easily hold the place of honor and the historic names that have been given them.

titanic now

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titanic
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Those with serious inquiries about the scrap book and all contents may contact my friend Steve at Crown Precious Metals in Sacramento, California.
 
Crown Precious Metals
3245 Folsom Blvd
Sacramento, CA 95816
(916) 456-6227
http://www.eastsacpreciousmetals.com/
 
Read an account of the tragic night from a survivor of the Titanic tragedy at Yesteryear Gazette:  http://yesteryeargazette.wordpress.com/2014/06/06/how-i-was-saved-from-the-titanic-1912/
 

23 thoughts on “If the Titanic had safely landed on April 16, 1912

  1. Pingback: If the Titanic had safely landed on Apirl 16, 1912 | West Coast Review

  2. I have always had this eerie curiosity and small obsession with the Titanic. Especially when I found the book, Wreck of the Titan by Morgan Robertson in 1898! The similarities were uncanny. I watched an interesting documentary on the Titanic, it had survivors talk about it. This one woman was describing smells, and people, and she looked like she was off in a dream. If I find the link I’ll post it! It was really interesting and she discussed what she thought about if it would have gotten here safely.

    In my opinion with the Titanic, people got to cocky. Naming is “Unsinkable” it got to their heads. And sadly, they didn’t pay much attention.

  3. There will always be something of the haunted ship about The Titanic. Captures all our imaginations…must have been marvellous! Such a lot of work went into this Juliette. Great facts!

    • It was such a surprise to come by this. The scrap book is full of everything from letters from the owners children to the lead from a cork that was popped on New Year’s Eve. And under T was a few items from the Titanic. There must have been a company line on what was said by the employees of the Red and White Star lines. Any bit of history takes us back like a time machine and makes us still feel for the people involved even if it was 100 years ago.

  4. For her short lift, she was the queen of the sea…, but not unsinkable. There will always be haunting questions about her route and the decision not to turn further southward when icebergs were sighted. This was a great find and post, J.
    Paul

  5. My son is fascinated by the Titanic. I have always been disturbed by it. The idea of all those people. I never wanted to watch the movie and have seen only parts of it. If only, if only, if only…just about the saddest thing to have to say. If only…

    • After 100 years it still grips us. It was hard to do the transcription over a year ago. It was weird and so sad and even shocking.

      Someone in Asia is going to (or say they are going to) build an exact replica of the Titanic and sail it on the same path. To me that is so disrespectful to those who were lost. It is just wrong.

  6. After so many years, this event still fascinates us…
    What I wonder sometimes is: The Titanic is still where it sunk… means: The investment to get this ship up is far too high compared to the outcome. But who has EVER paid the insurance? IF it was paid… who has looked for the families of the victims? ALL of them, not only the rich ones?
    Sometimes it scares me to think about how many people died that night… 😦

  7. It is so hard not to think of the night the Titanic went through such a horrendous experience. I feel so for the people that did not make it into the life boats. How much in despair they must have felt and how brave those who stayed behind after letting their families go as they stayed behind. It is difficult not to sense their experiences these many years later. It was just like a moment in time before now. That is how etched into our memories even if we were not alive at that time in history. I am superstitious, so to spit in the eye of whoever commands fate, and say that the Titanic is “Unsinkable” is such a demonstration of arrogance. Also, if the stories are true that one of the members of the White Star Line wanted to be even more impressive by getting the Titanic to NYC at a faster rate than expected and demanded of the Titanic captain to press on, should be shouldering the fact that so many met their deaths on that tragic night. And if one has to pay for being such a pompous, arrogant, fool may he pay whatever price he must. He was unforgivable in his actions to stroke ego over the lives of people who were not only those of the elite but those who were hard working citizens who just wanted to come to America to expand their livelihoods. It was such a shock that something so inconceivable could happen that was so unexpected and so many died in such a shocking and disturbing manner. It would make it impossible to forget the Titanic and we should not forget it. I am overwhelmed with shock whenever I think of those poor people who suffered on that night. I cannot imagine what they went through. And those that did survive thinking they might have helped more people to survive must have caused a great deal of guilt after they survived at the expense of other. The Titanic will always be something that will haunt us. And for myself, it will definitely haunt me and it does hold a fascination, not in a good way, but to be going along at such a relaxed pace enjoying the experience, thinking nothing about mortality and then smashing right into it. It gives one pause at when and if that kind of mortality will ever face you in your own life. I’m sure it has effected/affected a great many of us during the course of our own lives. Not on the same level as the Titanic in world headlines that can be seen or remembered today. It is like any disaster, it will go down in history and always be remembered. Just as the assassination of Lincoln and JFK. The downing of the Twin Towers (World Trade Center) in NYC 9/11. There are some things that can never be forgotten. The Titanic is one of those catastrophes. This was an amazing find. There is nothing wrong with having a fascination with the Titanic. It is good that we remember how infallible what people build can be and how the shocking can happen when we lease expect it. jk the secret keeper jennifer

  8. Thank you so much for you comment. You’ve done your research well. The tragedy of the Titanic will capture people from years to come, even more so than other events.

    J. Bruce Ismay was the head of White Star Lines. In the scrap book, along with the press release was a copy of a letter sent to all White Star Employees – sort of a rebutal to all of the bad press. They were right on top of it trying to keep the blame off. They wanted to move on as fast as they could.

    The Titanic was pumped up to be larger than life even before it was built. The hupe was tremendous. The ship represented dreams, plus so many famous and extremely wealthy people were on board. And most of have also been captured by the dreams of those on board who were not rich or famous. They haven’t been forgotten.

    Thanks again so much for sharing.

  9. Pingback: If the Titanic had safely landed on Apirl 16, 1912 | West Coast Review

  10. This was a chilling and most interesting post Juliette and a great way to kick off a new year! So many questions remain when it comes to this mystery. Always been captivated by this story. Thank you!

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